Forum - Banjo Ben Clark

Discuss the Guitar lesson: Common Major Chords

https://banjobenclark.com/lessons/common-major-chords-guitar-beginner

You’ve heard that money is what makes the world go round? That’s wrong. Chords. Chords are what make the world go round.

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Ben, Just curious, of the different fingering styles of placement, which ones are used more than others? Also, does the Genre of the music tend to dictate which fingers are used in placing the chords as well?

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To my knowledge, there aren’t any rules for this. I will say that bluegrass pickers tend to like to play out of the G position more than other players, so you’ll see a capo on a bluegrass guitar more often than other genres.

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How do you feel about playing a C chord with the added G on the low string? That is, third finger is placed on the 3rd fret, sixth string, and the fourth finger is on the 3rd fret fifth string? I find that gives the C chord a richer sound, and still can be changed quickly if to add other C variations.

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Yeah, I love it and will do it quite often, especially when I’m ending on a C chord.

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I always play a C chord like that. I love playing the alternating pick/strum pattern with that low G in the C chord, as opposed to the higher open 3rd string G.

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Hey Eric! Welcome to the board!

Yup, that’s practically the only way I strum a C. An exception that comes to mind is when finger picking and I need my pinky for other strings.

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I usually fret both with my third cuz I use my pinky for other things usually. When alternate bass strumming you can just move the finger also

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Hi All! This is my first Banjo Ben Forum post. I’m a newbie at EVERYTHING guitar. To introduce myself: Hi, my name is Phil and I’m struggling with chords, Specifically my issues are with my fingers stretching to reach the appropriate strings, scrunching up to touch only the appropriate strings (hello A chord), barring strings, and pretty much everything. Does anyone have any advice on ways to improve this as quickly as possible? Also, have any of you utilized any type of “pocket guitar” for chord practice that feels like the real thing, but doesn’t require the real thing for times when I can’t have a guitar on my lap (i.e. at my desk, in the car, etc.)? Thank you!

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Hey Phil welcome aboard. I am by no means a guitar expert but I do enjoy playing rythm guitar so I know exactly what you are talking about. I know this is going to sound really cliche but the thing that helped me the most was playing the hound out of that old Yamaha (aka practice). The more I messed with her the better I got (still not perfect). Its just all about getting the feel for it. The most important thing is to have fun and don’t give up this time investment really pays for itself in the future. Hope this helps. :wolf:

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Welcome, @phil4liberty! If your chords are not sounding cleanly, there’s a good chance that your hand position is off. The best way to diagnose the cause of the problem is to post a short video in the Video Swap category so @BanjoBen and others can give you advice.

-Michael

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Neighbor, the best way is come to my house and play some guitar with me! Haha!

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Thank you for the thoughts… will do. Practice makes permanent and need to toughen up my computer keyboard fingers anyway.

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Thank you Michael… I haven’t tried that yet but will keep it in mind.

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Sounds like a plan!!! :smile:

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One thing I have found that helps to learn your chords faster is to implement a metronome and practice changing from chord to chord. Even if some of the strings are getting muted, you will work that out in time. Just use the metronome and speed it up by 5 beats per minutes when you feel comfortable at the previous speed.

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