Discuss the Banjo lesson: 6th Interval Backup– G, C, & D Chords


#1

https://banjobenclark.com/lessons/6th-interval-backup-g-c-d-chords-banjo

There are a few lessons on the site that I consider “groundbreaking.” This is one of them.


#2

Hey Ben, this lesson has helped me at least get to the ballpark, but I’m still having a hard time finding what the banjo player is doing for his break at about 1 minute and 13 seconds in the song : https://youtu.be/KYNvbbWVXK8. “I thought I Heard You Callin’ My Name” -Danny Paisley


#3

Please create a separate post in the banjo forum category with a title like: “I thought I Heard You Callin’ My Name” Banjo Lick

Post the same question and me or someone else will help you when we have time. Thanks!


#4

Can’t view the video it’s locked in the UK


#5

I’m really enjoying this lesson but I have a question because the use of “x” and “y” shapes is confusing me. Are these just the two finger versions of our already learned “x” and “y” or are these completely different?


#6

Got it! Had to finish the whole 6th course but now I see! Thanks.


#7

Am I wrong in observing that only two out of the three positions is a sixth interval, the lower B to higher G and lower D higher B, whereas the other combination lower G to higher D is a fifth?


#8

Correct, those are the only two 6th intervals possible using the major triad notes. I teach the 5th to show the chord position for reference. Thanks!


#9

Obviously, these could instead be played using the first and third strings with a closed X or Y position going up and down the neck. Can you give me the sales pitch for just using a two-finger position? It does force me to learn the notes on the neck better when I use the two—finger approach. Are there other reasons?


#10

economy of motion
comfort
speed


#11

I concur with what @fiddle_wood said and would add it increases your knowledge of the finger board.


#12

So cool! Now I can start learning the blues on banjo! If I ever find the time :roll_eyes: