Bow Legged Pinky Finger


#1

Frustrated with my bow legged pinky. If I try and space it out further down the neck it bows in to the point where I am fretting with the side more than the tip. If keep it close to the ring finger than I can’t get it down towards the fret.
Anyone else have this issue? I’ve tried watching videos but they all deal with pinky strength but not this problem. I have plenty of strength in my pinky.


#2

I think this is probably common. I have the same issue and mitigated it by working the muscles of the palm, specifically the flexor/abductor digiti min. Finger strength is necessary but not sufficient; hand muscles need to be conditioned, too. I’m not a kinesiologist – I can only say my issue is way better than 2 yrs ago.


#3

So the question is, when you hold your fingers straight, as if you were showing someone that you have 5 fingers on your hand, is the little finger bent in toward your ring finger or is it straight like the other fingers? The reason I ask is because some folks have a little finger that is bent in toward the others when held straight and I do not believe there is much you can do in this instance. However, if it is straight like your other fingers, then you can re-train yourself to keep that finger straight while playing.

For most folks, when you bend (curl) your fingers toward the fingerboard while playing, all of your fingers tend to bend toward each other (as if you were holding your palm toward your face and looking at the fingernails on that hand). You will notice that your index finger and little finger both point toward the center of your palm. This common physical trait makes it difficult (but not impossible) to get any decent fretboard stretch when playing. The trick is to keep your fingers straight as possible when having to stretch them apart while playing. For example, play an Fmaj7 this way: 1,x,x,5,5,5 with your index finger playing the 1st fret of the 6th string and your little finger playing the 5th fret of the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string. The only way to do this is to allow your fingers to stay straight as possible to get that 5 fret stretch on opposite sides of the fingerboard.

This is a common technique taught to classical guitar players so that they can reach difficult stretches on the fingerboard. The problem is that your left wrist tends to be hyper-extended. However, the same technique can be used in less difficult stretches while allowing your wrist to stay in a more relaxed straightened position.

Again, when you hold your fingers straight, if your little finger is bent hard toward the other fingers, then you may be SOL.


#4

— Begin quote from “drguitar”

For example, play an Fmaj7 this way: 1,x,x,5,5,5 with your index finger playing the 1st fret of the 6th string and your little finger playing the 5th fret of the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string.

— End quote

That’s a nice little challenge :smiley:
My wrist is wrapped so far around that my thumb is on the “wrong” side of the neck.


#5

Looking at the original pics… it looks like it might help to rotate your palm away from the neck a bit (rotating the wrist like turning a door knob clockwise).