Putting the Circle of 5ths into Practice


#1

After watching the theory vids, and looking around YT for other explainer videos, I understand the Circle of 5ths, at least theoretically (no pun intended),

But I’d like to find a way to put the Co5 into a physical practice routine, that will teach the note relationships and ultimately, lead to helping improvisation.

I envision running through the entire Circle like a giant scale, but figuring that out note by note seems daunting. Are there any lessons/tabs that help with this?

Or - comments on whether it’s a worthwhile pursuit?


#2

Hey man! I think it’s important to know how the circle works, yes, but I don’t know about running through a giant scale. I’m not saying it’s bad, but I think there may be pursuits more worth our time. Make sure you know how it works, how to count down or up. Know a 5th above and a 5th below, or what the 5th is of the note/chord you’re on, and what note/chord is your note a 5th of. This will come in handy as I press more into the pentatonic mandolin stuff.


#3

I’ve used this Interactive Circle of Fifth’s on and off for many years it’s handy when I am trying to figure out stuff in different keys .or trying to figure out which minor chord fits an unfamiliar chord progression…

https://randscullard.com/CircleOfFifths/


#4

The Circle of Fifths is useful in multiple ways.

Easy way to transpose.
An Easy way to figure out which Chord

corresponds to each key signature… IE… The key of G is one sharp.
Easy way to discover related chords in every key
Easy way to discover Individual notes in every Chord in every key.
Great help when learning to play a chord instrument by ear.

FYI. I mentally reference the Circle of Fifths every time I pick up my guitar. It is the GPS of music. If you wish more info on any or all of the above, please let me know.

All the best,

Harv


#5

If you just want to improvise over it some and get used to the use and feel of it you might check out “Don’t Let Your Deal Go Down” . It is what I’d call a typical CO5th, Four chord progression…